The Need for Truly Professional Insurance People

A Method to Create Insurance Claims Professionals

For those who serve the insurance industry and its policyholders (whether as lawyers, adjusters, claims management, or public insurance adjusters) perform their duties appropriately it is absolutely necessary that they maintain insurance professionalism. A staff of insurance claims professionals who can read, understand and apply the terms and conditions of the insurance policy, treat all insureds, insurers, and claimants fairly and in good faith, and make sure the insurer and policyholder keep all of the promises made by the insurance policy, is essential. The insurance claim professional must be able to recognize and defeat attempts at insurance fraud while dealing ethically and in good faith with all insureds and claimants with whom the insurance professional comes in contact.

The following books provide a method to create insurance claims professionals. The books listed here are a small taste of the insurance and insurance claims books written by Barry Zalma and available on amazon.com and at http://zalma.com/blog/insurance-claims-library/

A copy in each insurance law office, in each insurance company and independent adjuster claims office and in the offices of every public insurance adjusting firm will provide essential resources and will go a long way to create a staff of insurance claims professionals.

Some of the books available to create or maintain insurance professionalism include:

Mold Claims

This series of books is the latest addition to Barry Zalma’s insurance claims series of books and articles that will form the most thorough, up-to-date, expert-authored insurance claims guide available today.

Mold Claims Volume One: Understanding insurance claims and litigation concerning mold, fungi, and bacteria infestations.Written by nationally-renowned insurance coverage expert Barry Zalma, a semi-retired insurance coverage attorney, consultant, expert witness and blogger, Mold Claims provides in-depth explanations, analysis, examples, and detailed discussion of:

•Mold;
•FungMold Claims Volume Two: Understanding insurance claims and litigation concerning mold, fungi, and bacteria infestations.i;
•Bacteria;

•Mold, fungi and bacteria claims; and
•Mold, Fungi, Bacteria litigation.

Thorough, yet practical, this series of books form the ideal gMold Claims Volume Three: Understanding insurance claims and litigation concerning mold, fungi, and bacteria infestations.uide for any professional who works in or frequently interacts with the insurance industry or is involved in litigation. Claims professionals, risk managers, producers, underwriters, attorneys (both plaintiff and defense), and business owners will benefit greatly from the mold volumes. It is also the perfect resource for insurance educators, trainers, and students whose role requires an understanding of insurance law as it relates to mold, fungi and bacterial infestations.

TMold Claims Volume Four: Understanding insurance claims and litigation concerning mold, fungi, and bacteria infestations.he author has provided checklists, sample procedures, form letters, tables and information and references to model statutes, state statutes, administrative regulations, and requirements of insurance departments nationwide.


Time to Rescind the Tort of Bad Faith

Insurance and the Law of Unintended Consequences Paperback 

Insurance is, and always will be, a business of the utmost good faith. Time to Rescind the Tort of Bad Faith: Insurance and the Law of Unintended ConsequencesAll parties to the insurance contract agree, in good faith and fair dealing, to do nothing to deprive the other the benefits of the contract. Insurance is, and always be, nothing more than a contract.

The insurer makes a promise to the insured that if a contingent or unknown loss occurs caused by a peril or risk insured against and not excluded, to pay the insured indemnity as promised by the contract up to the limits provided.

The insured promises to truthfully disclose the risks of loss faced by the insured, property owned by the insured, the business of the insured and/or the insured’s liability exposures. The insured also promises to honestly present a claim, prove the claim, and cooperate with the insurer in its investigation. If the parties to the insurance contract deal with each other fairly and in good faith the policy remains viable, claims are paid promptly and to the satisfaction of the insurer and the insured.

Only if a true tort occurs can the insured waive the contract action and sue in tort. Breach of contract, by centuries old tradition, is not a tort and cannot and should not be considered a tort. The Tort of Bad Faith has served its purpose and is now causing more problems than it solves. It is time the courts and state legislatures rescind the tort and return to common law contract damages.


“Insurance Fraud & Weapons to Defeat Insurance Fraud”

In Two Volumes

Product DetailsInsurance fraud continually takes more money each year than it did the last from the insurance buying public. No one knows the actual amount with any certainty because most attempts at insurance fraud succeed. Estimates of the extent of insurance fraud in the United States range from $87 billion to more than $300 billion every year.

Insurers and government backed pseudo-insurers can only estimate the extent they lose to fraudulent claims. Lack of sufficient investigation and prosecution of insurance criminals is endemic. Most insurance fraud criminals are not detected. Those that are detected do

so because they became greedy, sloppy and unprofessional so that the attempted fraud becomes so obvious it cannot be ignored.

No one will ever be able to place an exact number on the amount lost to insurance fraud. Everyone who has looked at the issue knows – whether based on their heart, their gut or empirical fact determined from convictions for the crime of insurance fraud – that the number is enormous.

When insurers and governments put on a serious effort to reduce the amount of insurance fraud the number of claims presented to insurers and the pseudo-government-based or funded insurers drops logarithmically. Since the appointment of Attorney General Sessions, the effort to stop insurance fraud against Medicare and Medicaid has increased.

Insurance Fraud & Weapons to Defeat Fraud - Volume Two: A Manual for Those Working to Defeat Insurance Fraud by [Zalma, Barry]This book contains appellate decisions regarding insurance fraud from federal and state appellate courts across the country and full text of many insurance fraud statutes.

It is available as both a legal research tool and a product to assist insurers, insurance company personnel, independent insurance adjusters, special investigation unit investigators, state fraud investigators and insurance lawyers to become effective persons involved in the attempt to defeat or reduce the effect of insurance fraud.

Volume One available as a Kindle book and a paperback.

Volume Two Available as a Kindle book and a paperback

The Compact Book of Adjusting Property Insurance Claims”

A Manual for the First Party Property Insurance Adjuster

The insurance adjuster is not mentioned in a policy of insurance. The The Compact Book of Adjusting Property Insurance Claims: A Manual for the First Party Property Insurance Adjusterobligation to investigate and prove a claim falls on the insured. Standard first party property insurance policies, based upon the New York Standard Fire Insurance policy, contain conditions that require the insured to, within sixty days of the loss, submit a sworn proof of loss to prove to the insurer the facts and amount of loss.

The policy allows the insurer to then, and only then, respond to the insured’s proof of loss. The insurer can then either accept or reject the proof submitted by the insured.

Technically, if the wording of the policy was followed literally the insurer could sit back, do nothing, and wait for the proof. If the insured was late in submitting the proof the insurer could reject the claim. If the insured submits a timely proof of loss the insurer could either accept or reject the proof of loss. If the insurer rejected the proof of loss the insured could either send a new one or give up and gain nothing from the claim. Suit on the policy would be difficult because the policy contract limited the right to sue to times when the proof of loss condition had been met.

Insureds and insurers were not happy with that system. It made it too difficult for a lay person to successfully present a claim. The system, as written into the standard fire policy seemed to run counter to the covenant of good faith and fair dealing that had been the basis of the insurance contract for centuries. Most insurers understood that their insureds were mostly incapable of complying with the strict enforcement of the policy conditions. To fulfill the covenant of good faith and fair dealing insurers created the insurance adjuster to fulfill its obligation to deal fairly and in good faith with the insured.

Available as a Kindle book.

Available as a paperback.

“The Compact Book on Adjusting Liability Claims”

A Handbook for the Liability Claims Adjuster

This Compact Book of Adjusting Liability Claims is designed to Product Detailsprovide the new adjuster with a basic grounding in what is needed to become a competent and effective insurance adjuster. It is also available as a refresher for the experienced adjuster.

The liability claims adjuster quickly learns that there is little difficulty with a claimant (the person alleging bodily injury or property damage against a person insured) if the claim is paid as demanded. The insured may be unhappy if the claimant’s claim is paid as presented since most do not believe they did anything wrong or fear an increase in premiums charged for subsequent policies.

The adjuster must be prepared to salve the insured’s emotions, explain why in the law and the policy it was appropriate to pay the claimant and that the settlement is in the best interest of both the insured and the insurer the adjuster represents.
The adjuster knows, and must be prepared to explain to an insured, that if a claim is resisted or denied the claimant will be unhappy, will probably file suit. If not promptly settled the claimant’s lawyers will rake the insured over the coals to prove that the insured is liable for the claimant’s injuries. The litigation will take time, effort, and money to establish the extent of the injuries and who is responsible for the injuries. Failure to settle promptly can cost the insured his or her reputation and will certainly cost the insurer much more than the claim could have been resolved for had it been resolved before the claimant retained a lawyer.

Available as a Kindle book

Available as a paperback.

Read about these and other insurance books by Barry Zalma at http://zalma.com/blog/insurance-claims-library/

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About Barry Zalma

An insurance coverage and claims handling author, consultant and expert witness with more than 48 years of practical and court room experience.
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1 Response to The Need for Truly Professional Insurance People

  1. Pingback: Zalma’s Insurance Fraud Letter – March 15, 2019 | Zalma on Insurance

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