New Books for Insurance Professionals Now Available at Amazon.com

Books by Barry Zalma, Esq., CFE

The Compact Book on Ethics for The Insurance Professional

How Ethical Doctrines from the Beginning of the Written Word to the Present Resulted in the Incorporation of the Covenant of Good Faith

Every Person Involved in the Business of Insurance Must Act Ethically in the Business of Insurance

Insurance is, by definition, a business of the utmost good faith. This means that both parties to the contract of insurance must act fairly and in good faith to each other and do nothing that will deprive the other of the benefits the contract of insurance promised.

Without the covenant of good faith and fair dealing, and ethical people who work in the insurance industry applying and fulfilling the covenant, effective insurance to spread the risk of loss to a large community of insurance professionals, is impossible. One cannot act fairly and in good faith without being a person with a well-formed ethical compass.

In 1776, Lord Mansfield acting as an appellate judge serving in the House of Lords of Britain (the predecessor of the United Kingdom) for the first time referred to the covenant of good faith and fair dealing. In the case designated: Carter v. Boehm S.C. 1 Bl. Burr 1906, 11th May 1766. 593, 3 Lord Mansfield in the British House of Lords stated the rule of uberrimae fide (Latin for utmost good faith).

Ethics & Ethical Behavior are Essential to Every Insurance Professional

Good faith forbids either party by concealing what he privately knows, to draw the other into a bargain, from his ignorance of that fact, and his believing the contrary.

The implied covenant is simply stated by explaining that no party to a contract of insurance should do anything to deprive the other of the benefits of the contract.

Since at least 1766, the business of insurance is a business of the utmost good faith. Each party to a contract of insurance must deal with each other ethically. This book will consider and explain different ethical concepts from the Code of Hammurabi more than 3000 years ago to modern ethical philosophers.

The general duty of good faith and fair dealing incorporated by reference into every policy of insurance requires a complete understanding of ethics and ethical behavior.

The covenant is mutual, and the principles of good faith and fair dealing impose an affirmative obligation on the insured to cooperate as much as it requires the insurer to treat the insured fairly with regard to every claim presented.

Without the covenant of good faith and fair dealing, and ethical people who work in the insurance industry applying and fulfilling the covenant, effective insurance to spread the risk of loss to a large community of insurance professionals, is impossible. One cannot act fairly and in good faith without being a person with a well-formed ethical compass.
In 1776, Lord Mansfield acting as an appellate judge serving in the House of Lords of Britain (the predecessor of the United Kingdom) for the first time referred to the covenant of good faith and fair dealing. In the case designated: Carter v. Boehm S.C. 1 Bl. Burr 1906, 11th May 1766. 593, 3 Lord Mansfield in the British House of Lords stated the rule of uberrimae fide (Latin for utmost good faith):

What is The Purpose of the Book

This book considers and explains different ethical concepts from the Code of Hammurabi more than 3000 years ago to modern ethical philosophers.

The book covers, at least:

  • What is Insurance?
  • Ethics & Ethical Behavior.
  • Ethical Insurance
  • The Development of the Implied Covenant of Good Faith & Fair Dealing.
  • The Tort of Bad Faith
  • The Ethical Insurance Professional
  • Applying Ethics to the Work of the Insurance Professional
  • Sarbanes Oxley & the Ethical Insurance Professional
  • What Happens When a Cort Creates an Ethical Conflict When None Exists?
  • Ethics and Insurance Fraud
  • Ethics in the Insurance Industry
  • Case Studies of Ethical Breach

The Covenant of Good Faith and Fair Dealing is a statement of the ethical basis of the insurance business.

The book is available as a Kindle book, a Paperback or a Hardcover

“How to Acquire, Understand, and Make a Successful Claim on a Commercial Property Insurance Policy: Information Needed for Individuals and Insurance Pros to Deal With Commercial Property Insurance”

The New Book is now available as a Kindle book here, paperback here and as a hardcover here

Commericial Property Insurance is a necessity for any person or entity owning a piece of commercial property whether it is small or large, whether it is an office building or a warehouse or a factory.

A property owner – unless exceptionally wealthy – cannot afford the risk of losing that property, what it earns from tenants paying rent or from the product produced at the property.

Commercial property insurance is a specialized form of insurance designed to to protect the owner or lessee of the property from loss due to perils like fire, lightning, windstorm, hail, earthquake, flood, tornado or other risks of loss.

Most commercial property insurance policies are written on a “direct risk of physical loss” or “all risk of physical loss” basis subject to exclusions that are directly related to to the risks faced by the property or some standard exclusions.

This books explains the coverages provided by a commercial property insurance policy, how to acquire a policy of commercial property insurance, what the policy of commercial property insurance insures, how to present a claim, and how to successfully present a claim and collect the funds needed to repair or replace the structure and indemnify the insured against the losses incurred because of the interruption of the business of the insured.

The Tort of Bad Faith

What Every Insurance Professional, Every Insurance Coverage Lawyer, Every Plaintiffs Bad Faith Lawyer, and Every Insurance Claims Person Must know About the Tort of Bad Faith

A Book Needed by Every Insurance Claims Professional

The implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing is a concept of insurance law at least three centuries old. It first appeared in British jurisprudence in a case decided by Lord Mansfield sitting in the House of Lords as the highest court in Britain. In Carter v. Boehm. 3Burrow, 1905, Lord Mansfield explained that insurance is a contract upon speculation; the special facts upon which the contingent chance is to be computed, lie, most commonly, in the knowledge of the insured only. The underwriter trusts to his representation, and proceeds upon confidence that he does not keep back any circumstance in his knowledge, to mislead the underwriter into a belief that the circumstance does not exist, and to induce him to estimate the risk as if it did not exist.The keeping back such circumstance is a fraud, and therefore the policy is void.

Lord Mansfield stated the rule still followed to this day: “Good faith forbids either party by concealing what he privately knows, to draw the other into a bargain, from his ignorance of that fact, and his believing the contrary.

Available as a Hardcover   Available as a paperback  Available as a Kindle Book

The Equitable Remedy of Rescission of Insurance

An Effective Tool to detect, deter and defeat insurance Fraud Hardcover – June 17, 2022

The Equitable Remedy of Rescission

Rescission is an equitable remedy first created in the ecclesiastical courts of Elizabethan England.

Following the common law tradition, legal principles were referred to courts of equity to “mitigate the rigor” of the common law.

The new United States of America adopted British common law as the law once the U.S. Constitution was adopted in 1789. British common law was only modified by the limitations placed on the central government by the Constitution.

The viability and ability to enforce contracts was recognized as essential to commerce. Courts of law, following the British Common Law, were charged with enforcing legitimate contracts and rendering money judgments against the party who breached the contract.

It became clear, however, that some contract disputes cannot be resolved with a money judgment. Rather, it needed the assistance of the courts of equity whose judges, in the Elizabethan era were presided over by priests who were believed to be better able to render fair judgments.

It was not until 1875 that equity was practiced in the common law courts. The existence of a dual system entailed that, for example, when a defendant had an equitable defense to a common law action, he would have to go to the Court of Chancery to obtain an injunction to suspend the proceedings in common-law court. He would then begi

n a fresh action for relief in the Court of Chancery. Facing duality persisted until the Judicature Acts which created the Supreme Court of Judicature and allowed all courts to exercise both a common law and equitable jurisdiction.

The judge in a court of equity can weigh many different sides to a case and explore different perspectives to arrive at a judgment.

Available as: A Kindle book A Paperback or a hardcover .

(c) 2022 Barry Zalma & ClaimSchool, Inc.

Barry Zalma, Esq., CFE, now limits his practice to service as an insurance consultant specializing in insurance coverage, insurance claims handling, insurance bad faith and insurance fraud almost equally for insurers and policyholders. He practiced law in California for more than 44 years as an insurance coverage and claims handling lawyer and more than 54 years in the insurance business. He is available at http://www.zalma.com and zalma@zalma.com.Subscribe and receive videos limited to subscribers of Excellence in Claims Handling at locals.com https://zalmaoninsurance.locals.com/subscribe.Subscribe to Excellence in Claims Handling at https://barryzalma.substack.com/welcome.

Now available Barry Zalma’s newest book, The Tort of Bad Faith, and How to Acquire, Understand, and Make a Successful Claim on a Commercial Property Insurance Policy: Information Needed for Individuals and Insurance Pros to Deal With Commercial Property Insurance” the New Books are now available as a Kindle book here, paperback here and as a hardcover here available at amazon.com.

Write to Mr. Zalma at zalma@zalma.com; http://www.zalma.comhttp://zalma.com/blog; daily articles are published at https://zalma.substack.com. Go to the podcast Zalma On Insurance at https://anchor.fm/barry-zalma; Follow Mr. Zalma on Twitter at https://twitter.com/bzalma; Go to Barry Zalma videos at Rumble.com at https://rumble.com/c/c-262921; Go to Barry Zalma on YouTube- https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCysiZklEtxZsSF9DfC0Expg; Go to the Insurance Claims Library – https://zalma.com/blog/insurance-claims-library

 

About Barry Zalma

An insurance coverage and claims handling author, consultant and expert witness with more than 48 years of practical and court room experience.
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